Varicella Virus Vaccine, Live (Subcutaneous Route)

Name: Varicella Virus Vaccine, Live (Subcutaneous Route)

Canadian Brand Name

  1. Varilrix

Descriptions

Varicella virus live vaccine is an active immunizing agent that is given to protect against infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV). The vaccine works by causing the body to produce its own protection (antibodies) against the virus.

Varicella (commonly known as chickenpox) is an infection that is easily spread from one person to another. Chickenpox is usually a mild infection but sometimes it can cause serious problems, such as pneumonia, inflammation of the brain, and a rare disease called Reye's syndrome.

Immunization against chickenpox is recommended for anyone 12 months of age and older who has not had chickenpox. Immunization against chickenpox is not recommended for infants younger than 12 months of age.

You can be considered to be immune to chickenpox only if you have received 2 doses of the varicella vaccine. You also are considered to be immune if you have a doctor's diagnosis of a previous chickenpox infection or if you have had a blood test showing that you are immune to the varicella virus.

This vaccine is to be administered only by or under the supervision of your doctor or other authorized health care professional.

This product is available in the following dosage forms:

  • Powder for Suspension

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of varicella virus vaccine in children 1 year of age and older. However, varicella virus vaccine is not recommended for infants younger than 12 months of age.

Geriatric

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of varicella virus vaccine in the elderly.

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